Commentary-Brexit: What Now?

On Tuesday evening, the Government suffered a historic defeat in the House of Commons. The Withdrawal Agreement that Theresa May has spent years negotiating and months trying to sell to MPs was decisively rejected-202 ayes to 432 noes. In the aftermath of this catastrophic defeat and the subsequent failed Vote of No Confidence, what now for Brexit? Some of our writers share their thoughts on the situation.

  Continue reading “Commentary-Brexit: What Now?”

Sudan: A Revolution in the Making?

620x349

By Rob Johnston

The 2011 Arab Springs shaped much of the contemporary Middle East and North African (MENA) region, but the large, mainly desert country of Sudan appeared to be unaffected. That is until now. In the past four weeks we have seen increasing tensions within the country as protestors take to the streets, speaking out against current President Omar al-Bashir.

Continue reading “Sudan: A Revolution in the Making?”

To Be or Not to Be: UK’s EU Withdrawal, a Shakespeare Tragedy in the making? Opinion Piece on British Reality

brexit

By Sophie Minter

On the 10th December 2018 the press release published by the Court of Justice in the European Union, while perhaps representing a figurative and patronizing shrug of the shoulders as if to say “it’s ok, we all make mistakes”, represented a significant public acknowledgment. We (The UK) now have other options than simply those of insanity. The contents of the press release outlining the judgment made in Luxemburg offers an essential second chance.

Continue reading “To Be or Not to Be: UK’s EU Withdrawal, a Shakespeare Tragedy in the making? Opinion Piece on British Reality”

How monolingualism is costing the UK £48 billion a year.

Image result for languages

By Kit Henderson

I’m sure by now that we’ve all heard about the diminishing take ups in Modern Foreign languages at GCSE, A-Level and degree level, while the number of languages on offer has increased dramatically take up is down, and there seems to be little to suggest that it’s going to improve, which is a problem. Beyond the obvious issue of Britons assuming everyone else will speak English, only to be perceived as arrogant, there is also a huge economic cost to our monolingualism, one that seems likely to increase.

Continue reading “How monolingualism is costing the UK £48 billion a year.”

The Calm Between The Storms

By Thomas Sherlock

Today has been dramatic to say the least.

Two secretaries of state have resigned. Two junior ministers have resigned. Several MPs have publicly declared their letters to the 1922 Committee, calling for a vote of no confidence in the leadership of Theresa May. The necessary 48 letters have not been received (yet).

Studying politics often means deriving a strange sense of enjoyment out of tumultuous days such as this, and it’s easy to see why. Twists and turns at all corners, sudden character developments-it’s the same reason TV series such as House of Cards and Bodyguard entertain. However unlike those shows, today might have very, very real consequences.

Continue reading “The Calm Between The Storms”

The Political Mess in Brazil Following ‘Operation Car Wash’

105451675-1536936501400gettyimages-1030324706.1910x1000

By Christian Oliver

It would surely be an understatement to deem Brazil’s political climate leading up to the October general election to be anything but dramatic and unpredictable. Presidential nominees have been stabbed, convicted for corruption, imprisoned, and have called for violent attacks on the opposition; all as a by-product of a corruption scandal bigger than ‘Watergate’.

Continue reading “The Political Mess in Brazil Following ‘Operation Car Wash’”

The US Exception: A Policy of Deny and Ignore-How the US has managed to turn a blind eye to blatant human rights abuses

US-Saudi article

By Sophie Minter

For years the US-Saudi relationship has been an irritating itch, one that is not understandable and blatantly one sided, but what the recent assassination of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi shows is that this relationship will endure reflecting one of those cringey bromance scenes where it is obvious that one of the two clearly loves the other more, and the other knows and openly exploits this one-sided relationship.

 

Continue reading “The US Exception: A Policy of Deny and Ignore-How the US has managed to turn a blind eye to blatant human rights abuses”