Author Archives

RHUL PIR Society

We are the Royal Holloway Politics and International Relations Society, focussing on providing exciting and thought-provoking discourse and discussion around campus. Established in 2004, the society has hosted many key speakers such as Rt. Hon. Phillip Hammond, Baroness Catherine Ashton.

Rwandan Genocide: How the UN facilitated one of the most devastating genocides in history

rwanda-genocide

Content Warning: This article will discuss themes of genocide.

‘Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it’ – George Santayana (1906)

This popular quote has been emblazoned upon many murals and memorials, and ingrained in the hearts of many historians and political commentators. 24 years on, the UN has seemingly forgotten the past.

In 1994, the United Nations (UN) failed over 800,000 people, and facilitated one of history’s most infamous genocides.

Continue reading “Rwandan Genocide: How the UN facilitated one of the most devastating genocides in history”

What We’re Reading: ‘Fall Out’ by Tim Shipman

By Thomas Sherlock

imagesIn this comprehensive book, Tim Shipman aims to document the tumultuous events of British politics from the rise of Theresa May in July 2016 to her leadership under siege in October 2017. A follow-up to his previous book All-Out War, which covered the lead-up, campaign and immediate aftermath of the EU referendum in 2016, Fall Out provides an insight into the events that followed, ranging from the Chiefs’ management of Number 10, plotting in the corridors of Parliament and how the election thought to be the ultimate coup for May turned into a defeat snatched from the jaws of victory. Summarised as above, it is easy to mistake the events of the last two years for that of a political thriller.

Continue reading “What We’re Reading: ‘Fall Out’ by Tim Shipman”

Italy at the Polls between Violence and Silence

Article Photo

By Laura Serra 

Interesting political times are anything but over. The upcoming Italian general elections seem bound to shake again both national politics, and the politics of Europe at large. As in several other countries, and especially due to the impact of the refugee crisis on its shores, the populist wind blowing throughout Europe has found in Italy an especially receptive audience. Two out of the four main parties running can be considered ‘populist’, with the Five Star Movement (which supposedly has no political colouring) and the Northern League (which has a very dark political colouring) respectively making use of the anti-establishment and anti-immigration rhetoric; and finding common ground on their vigorous Euroscepticism. Immigration, specifically, is the issue most heavily discussed in political debates and the one most likely to be driving Italian votes. Like elsewhere in Europe, the ‘economic cleavage’ of working class and white-collar voters is being superseded by the ‘cultural cleavage’ of those who support cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism and those who do not. Continue reading “Italy at the Polls between Violence and Silence”

Many say Djibouti could soon become the next Dubai or Singapore, so what is holding it back?

Djibouti

By Francis Forsey

Known by few in common society, Djibouti is a country to watch.

With a population of 942,333 (2016), and a land area of 23,200 km2, Djibouti is one the smallest countries in the international community. To compare Djibouti to the hegemonic states around the world, such the United States, Russia or China, is to take leave of one’s senses. However, the world continues to remind us that size doesn’t matter when it comes to international significance. Continue reading “Many say Djibouti could soon become the next Dubai or Singapore, so what is holding it back?”

Bitcoin: The Politics of a Stateless Currency

Bitcoin

By Suhail Mayor

Throughout time, literature has been replete with a wide variety of differing accounts on the concept of money. Through these theoretical versions of discourse most of them follow a common thread; they are intensely political in nature. Money has always been and will be a talking point in relation to its control and the role of government. While one side suggests that government and laws are crucial to the nature of money, others have come to believe that currency and economic activity can arise spontaneously without a centralized authority. Emblematic of a basic law in economics inferring that government intervention always leads to inequalities in the market. Continue reading “Bitcoin: The Politics of a Stateless Currency”

Forgotten Ideas: Emma Goldman on Anarchism, Gender, and Prison

Emmagoldman

By Peter Marshall

“Anarchism, then, really stands for the liberation of the human mind from the domination of religion; the liberation of the human body from the domination of property; liberation from the shackles and restraint of government. Anarchism stands for a social order based on the free grouping of individuals for the purpose of producing real social wealth; an order that will guarantee to every life, according to individual desires, tastes, and inclination” (p. 35)

Content Warning: Minor reference to sexual abuse and harassment

“My goodness,” I am sure you thought to yourself, “I did enjoy that article about Robert Owen but I wonder if there will be anymore?” How kind of you to ask, let us celebrate because there is another one!  For those reading who do not know, I hope to introduce you to political thinkers who you are most likely not going to come across on your syllabus, and hopefully broaden your thought. I openly encourage others to do the same. This time I shall be exploring the 19th/20th century anarchist thinker Emma Goldman. I shall do this by briefly summarising her life before splitting her work into three sections. The first is anarchism, the second gender, and finally prison. I trust my reader’s ability to critique the work for themselves. Continue reading “Forgotten Ideas: Emma Goldman on Anarchism, Gender, and Prison”