Author Archives

RHUL PIR Society

We are the Royal Holloway Politics and International Relations Society, focussing on providing exciting and thought-provoking discourse and discussion around campus. Established in 2004, the society has hosted many key speakers such as Rt. Hon. Phillip Hammond, Baroness Catherine Ashton.

Varsity 2019: A Remainer’s Consideration of the Cons of the European Union

Varsity-Logo-Colour-not-date-2017By Allen Wesson (Politics and Economics student at University of Surrey)

Due to the current climate in the UK I am left wondering if this spell of warmer weather is a cruel trick played by the Gods to send more Patriotic Brexiteers to British holiday destinations this year, knowing full well that whatever happens on the 29th March or beyond, they will probably flock to mainland Spain, Magaluf and Ibiza anyway. Satire very much not aside, in a holy crusade of knowing what’s best for you, the archetypal hard-line ‘Remainer’ has in fact become what it set out to destroy – a fount of satirical nonsense, spouting stereotypes and further pushing divides between themselves and those who disagree.

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Why I Support: The Liberal Democrats

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By Jordan Montgomery

I joined the Liberal Democrats back in 2014, probably at the height of their unpopularity. My politically inclined friends would often question why I would ever join such a party – the Lib Dems were set to be decimated at the next election, they had alienated students through the tuition fees fiasco, and had entered a coalition with the Conservatives to the chagrin of so many of their supporters. Yet despite their tattered reputation, in this party I could see so much potential, not just as a home for my political views but for all of the United Kingdom.

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The Pill and the Pope

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By Georgie Day

Out of all contraceptive methods, the pill is one of the most popular types of female contraception, with an almost 99% effectiveness rate when used correctly. It cannot be disputed that the introduction of the pill has changed society forever. It gave women control over their reproductive organs and sex life, made casual sexual relationships less of a risk and taboo, and impacted greatly on women’s lives, both in a good light and not. In the US it is estimated that one third of women use the pill as contraception, however more than 50 years after becoming an established form of birth control, new research has changed the guidelines from the Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH). These updated guidelines now show that the common seven-day break while using most combined pills had no health benefits, and that there is nothing to be gained from stopping the contraceptive to have a monthly period. This understandably has caused a lot of questions to be asked – why was it ever a guideline? Why, more than half a decade on, are we just finding out that the pill could have been taken continuously?

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Why I Support: The Conservative Party

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By Tanya Solomon 

Some may suggest that due to recent events such as vote of no confidence in Theresa May, alongside a vote of no confidence in the current standing government, that support for the Conservative Party is a difficult position to stand for. On the contrary, I believe recent events, and the actions of multiple other parties in the house, have given me a plethora of reasons as to why I can continue to support the Conservative Party at this current time.

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Tides of Change: The Indian Election

 

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By Theo Larue

While Britain finds itself embroiled in the complexities of its exit from the European Union, it is important to remember that other areas of the world are undergoing important evolutions that will also have effects on global politics. India is set to elect representatives to the 17th Lok Sabha (India’s lower house) in April, which will determine the Prime Minister of the world’s largest democracy. It will either remain Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), the controversial Hindu nationalist who as cast himself as India’s strongman, or a challenger from the Indian National Congress (INC), India’s historical political party that was at the forefront of independence. If it is the latter, it is anyone’s guess who will be nominated to the Premiership. Continue reading “Tides of Change: The Indian Election”