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By Christian Oliver

It would surely be an understatement to deem Brazil’s political climate leading up to the October general election to be anything but dramatic and unpredictable. Presidential nominees have been stabbed, convicted for corruption, imprisoned, and have called for violent attacks on the opposition; all as a by-product of a corruption scandal bigger than ‘Watergate’.

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By Sarah Jasem

The Paradise Papers are 13.4 million leaked documents spanning the period between 1950 to 2016, which reveal the extent to which the assets of corporations like Facebook, and wealthy public figures from the Queen to Harvey Weinstein, are held offshore where they can be unregulated and untaxed. Almost 7 million of these documents are related to a law firm called ‘Appleby’, filled with lawyers who specialise in registering trusts and companies in overseas jurisdictions with little to no tax rates such as the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, Bermuda and Mauritius. The leaks were passed on from German Newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, ICIJ. Similarly, in 2016, the same newspaper leaked 11 million documents to the ICIJ where the tax avoidance was orchestrated not be Appleby but by Mossack Fonseca, a law firm in Panama, hence the 2016 leak being marked, ‘The Panama Papers’.

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By Vladimir Ivlev

“The ultimate difference between a truly radical emancipatory politics and populist politics is that the former is active, it imposes and enforces its vision, while populism is fundamentally re-active, the result of a reaction to a disturbing intruder.” – Slavoj Žižek, “First As Tragedy, Then As Farce” (2008)

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the overreaching Soviet social and political structure was replaced with swift liberalization of the markets and a bright promise of democracy. Yet, ironically, the Soviet structures of corruption and authoritarianism remained, giving the elite free reign over the new national civil and economic playgrounds. Two countries, Ukraine and Egypt, both having history in socialist policy, revolted against corruption at more or less concurrently.

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By Daniel Atherton

Comparing the demise of the European Union to the collapse of the Roman Empire.

“A rising power on the peripheries in the North East, an overreliance on imported labour, a faltering economy, the rise of an inhumane enemy from the Levant, overexpansion, political instability, corruption within constituent members, the loss/lack of a uniting identity, mass migration including refugee influxes, and the weakening of central authority.”

Evan Andrews, The History Channel

You’d be mistaken for presuming that the above text is describing the demise of the European Union. You’d be wrong – but forgivably so.

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By Yury Polyakov

 The voting patterns among the Russian-speaking people in Israel. Part 1.

The Russian Speaking Israeli people have voted differently in all Israeli General Elections. The primary reason for several switches from one side to another was that the Russian speakers were vulnerable to propaganda. Not all Russian Speakers are ethnic Jews because the non-Jewish family members could migrate to Israel alongside their Jewish spouse. Thus, this article will cover the issues in both Jewish and non-Jewish circles inside Israel.

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By Roger Maul

Autocracy, violence, terror, fear and oppression have enflamed modern day Turkey, as the secular and democratic values of the Kemalist Republic are ultimately discharged by a regime whose power has become seemingly irrepressible. And despite all the European outcry and protest toward Erdogan’s persistent flirtation with Ottoman nostalgia and his pursuit of Sultan-like absolutism, it seems like we have returned back to business as usual. As the prisons are filling with political opponents, media outlets being compelled to close and the juridical autonomy becoming merely a farce, it is all too necessary to dwell on the drastically changing character of Turkey and its decent into a dictatorial and socially divided nation.

14355033_1381372131892109_8836122230010910437_n By Jennifer Amspacher

Fidel Castro was 90 years old when he died on November 25, 2016. He was frail and sickly, yet his death still came to the world as a shock. Fidel Castro was President of Cuba from December 2, 1976 to February 24, 2008, when he resigned and gave power to his brother, Raúl Castro. Not only did he hold Presidency in Cuba for 47 years, Castro was first a law student at University of Havana– then rebel, revolutionary, self-proclaimed anti-imperialist and pro-soviet socialist; labeled as a fearsome dictator by critics and as an everlasting legend and icon by his supporters. The late Fidel Castro, no matter how you view him, was indubitably one of the most politically influential figures in Latin American history.