Category: Democracy

Can The Tories Win Over Young Voters?

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By Thomas Sherlock

As the dust settles from the general election politicians and commentators have been running wild trying to identify what exactly went wrong for Theresa May’s gambit. There have been many pieces written about the reception to the Tories’ manifesto, Labour’s strong campaign and Theresa May’s lacklustre performance, but it seems the media and the Conservative Party have chosen to focus on one particular weakness the election clearly exposed-the Tories have a serious problem with young voters. Continue reading “Can The Tories Win Over Young Voters?”

Catalonia – Why both sides are wrong.

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12741871_1267539223273075_6063705862090352672_n By Malick Nythern Doucoure

With waves still settling from the recent Tsunami that was the Catalan independence referendum and its aftermath, a show of unity and respect for democratic process and tradition is necessary from both sides. Catalonia is not Spain – it never has been! The region has a distinct language, culture and some would say even a distinct ethnicity to those in Madrid. The Catalan language is derived directly from common Latin, not Castilian Spanish – a frequent misconception used by many to promote a message of unity through a common linguistic heritage.

Continue reading “Catalonia – Why both sides are wrong.”

Despatch Box on #GE2017

 

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12832444_1099073710113815_5042964908509795414_n By Rob Cooke-Johnston

So it’s finally the big day to head down to your polling station and exercise your democratic right! Will this election be as people predicted when it was first announced, or will things not be quite as they seemed? As the polls begin to come out and we start to get a general idea of the votes, we’ll discuss and maybe even predict what we think will happen. So stick around for the rest of the evening for more updates!

Continue reading “Despatch Box on #GE2017”

Comparing ‘populist’ revolutions: Ukraine and Egypt

Vlad By Vladimir Ivlev

“The ultimate difference between a truly radical emancipatory politics and populist politics is that the former is active, it imposes and enforces its vision, while populism is fundamentally re-active, the result of a reaction to a disturbing intruder.” – Slavoj Žižek, “First As Tragedy, Then As Farce” (2008)

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the overreaching Soviet social and political structure was replaced with swift liberalization of the markets and a bright promise of democracy. Yet, ironically, the Soviet structures of corruption and authoritarianism remained, giving the elite free reign over the new national civil and economic playgrounds. Two countries, Ukraine and Egypt, both having history in socialist policy, revolted against corruption at more or less concurrently. Continue reading “Comparing ‘populist’ revolutions: Ukraine and Egypt”

Should Theresa May Trust the Polls?

daniela By Daniel Atherton

The 2015 General Election, British Referendum on the EU, and 2016 US Presidential Election all displayed conclusively that polls simply can’t be trusted. And yet, Prime Minister Theresa May is basing her newest attempt to gain a greater majority in the House of Commons, and as such a more secure route to passing post-EU legislation, in the strength of her party, the Conservatives, in the most recent polls. Continue reading “Should Theresa May Trust the Polls?”