Category: Democracy

Tides of Change: The Indian Election

 

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By Theo Larue

While Britain finds itself embroiled in the complexities of its exit from the European Union, it is important to remember that other areas of the world are undergoing important evolutions that will also have effects on global politics. India is set to elect representatives to the 17th Lok Sabha (India’s lower house) in April, which will determine the Prime Minister of the world’s largest democracy. It will either remain Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), the controversial Hindu nationalist who as cast himself as India’s strongman, or a challenger from the Indian National Congress (INC), India’s historical political party that was at the forefront of independence. If it is the latter, it is anyone’s guess who will be nominated to the Premiership. Continue reading “Tides of Change: The Indian Election”

The Audacious Rise of the Australian Populists

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By Christian Oliver

There truly is nothing quite like Australian politics. At the time of writing, the man currently at the helm of the Liberal National Party government is Scott Morrison, or ‘ScoMo’. If you know anything about Australian politics however, I might be so facetious as to suggest he will have been ‘back-stabbed’ and removed by a member of his cabinet by the time you get around to reading this. Although I am exaggerating, Morrison is the fifth Australian Prime Minister in as many years, and it is clear to see why so many Australians are losing confidence in mainstream politics.

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Sudan: A Revolution in the Making?

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By Rob Johnston

The 2011 Arab Springs shaped much of the contemporary Middle East and North African (MENA) region, but the large, mainly desert country of Sudan appeared to be unaffected. That is until now. In the past four weeks we have seen increasing tensions within the country as protestors take to the streets, speaking out against current President Omar al-Bashir.

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How monolingualism is costing the UK £48 billion a year.

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By Kit Henderson

I’m sure by now that we’ve all heard about the diminishing take ups in Modern Foreign languages at GCSE, A-Level and degree level, while the number of languages on offer has increased dramatically take up is down, and there seems to be little to suggest that it’s going to improve, which is a problem. Beyond the obvious issue of Britons assuming everyone else will speak English, only to be perceived as arrogant, there is also a huge economic cost to our monolingualism, one that seems likely to increase.

Continue reading “How monolingualism is costing the UK £48 billion a year.”

The Political Mess in Brazil Following ‘Operation Car Wash’

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By Christian Oliver

It would surely be an understatement to deem Brazil’s political climate leading up to the October general election to be anything but dramatic and unpredictable. Presidential nominees have been stabbed, convicted for corruption, imprisoned, and have called for violent attacks on the opposition; all as a by-product of a corruption scandal bigger than ‘Watergate’.

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Italy at the Polls between Violence and Silence

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By Laura Serra 

Interesting political times are anything but over. The upcoming Italian general elections seem bound to shake again both national politics, and the politics of Europe at large. As in several other countries, and especially due to the impact of the refugee crisis on its shores, the populist wind blowing throughout Europe has found in Italy an especially receptive audience. Two out of the four main parties running can be considered ‘populist’, with the Five Star Movement (which supposedly has no political colouring) and the Northern League (which has a very dark political colouring) respectively making use of the anti-establishment and anti-immigration rhetoric; and finding common ground on their vigorous Euroscepticism. Immigration, specifically, is the issue most heavily discussed in political debates and the one most likely to be driving Italian votes. Like elsewhere in Europe, the ‘economic cleavage’ of working class and white-collar voters is being superseded by the ‘cultural cleavage’ of those who support cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism and those who do not. Continue reading “Italy at the Polls between Violence and Silence”

Hang the Tories? The Abuse Conservatives Face

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By Megan Harris

I am sick to death of having to apologise for being a Tory.

At any social events when the conversation turns to politics, I fill with dread at the question; “So who did you vote for?” Let’s be clear, I’m incredibly proud to be a conservative. I believe that the Party has made some ground-breaking achievements. But its other people’s reactions that fill me with dread. Continue reading “Hang the Tories? The Abuse Conservatives Face”