Should Theresa May Trust the Polls?

daniela By Daniel Atherton

The 2015 General Election, British Referendum on the EU, and 2016 US Presidential Election all displayed conclusively that polls simply can’t be trusted. And yet, Prime Minister Theresa May is basing her newest attempt to gain a greater majority in the House of Commons, and as such a more secure route to passing post-EU legislation, in the strength of her party, the Conservatives, in the most recent polls. Continue reading “Should Theresa May Trust the Polls?”

Commentary – May’s GE2017 Speech

On the 18th of April, just before 11am, Prime Minister Theresa May surprised the nation when she announced her intention to hold a general election on the 8th of June. “The country is coming together, but Westminster is not” were her words and she made clear her reasoning for a 2017 general election being the disunity in Parliament, and a general feeling against Brexit by other political parties. These are the Despatch Box’s writer’s thoughts and feelings on this event, as well as their predictions on what will happen, and what the future holds for the political parties of the UK.

Continue reading “Commentary – May’s GE2017 Speech”

The Politics of Climate Change

12741871_1267539223273075_6063705862090352672_n By Malick Nythern Doucoure

In one of his widely acclaimed works – Politics – Aristotle Insists that man is a political animal because man is a social creature with the power of speech and moral reasoning. When contextualised in the world of today, one may argue that man politicises everything, from grammar schools to what curry we should order for dinner. This unfortunately includes climate change – a topic that if politicised, and it sure as hell is, could see work and efforts to tackle the issue severely delayed, which poses a detrimental risk to human beings across the planet.

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Keep Calm and Carry On

14650086_668112013362488_3300144392227324871_n By Megan Harris

At first I thought it was some sick joke, created by my colleague to wind me up as I was leaving our Parliamentary office early for the afternoon.

I told him to not be so stupid and to stop playing games, but panting- he had just sprinted up three flights of stairs- he insisted this was not a joke. Any doubts I had vanished when another colleague came crashing through the door.

The police had shouted at staff to get inside and undercover. Gunshots had been fired on the Parliamentary estate. That was the extent of our knowledge. Continue reading “Keep Calm and Carry On”

2017 Dutch Election: ‘politics for everyone’?

13124985_1187623707923241_3700041885703921844_n By Yury Polyakov

The Western World followed the capitalisation and democratisation processes that created the common ground for a normative basis of the regional European interest. Despite the active role played by the anarchists and the left, European countries sustained democracy and parliamentarism as shared ideals, whereas communism secured its strategic location in the Soviet Union and its influence sphere. The Netherlands obtained the essential element of all democracies – free and fair elections. This country formed a system with universal rights in 1917. However, the social transformations of today are global, and they shed light on the most sensitive topics that nobody wanted to discuss publicly in preceding decades.

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The Aftermath of the Political Storm in Copeland and Stoke

14650086_668112013362488_3300144392227324871_n  By Megan Harris

Storm Doris caused devastation across the country on Thursday night. Wheelie bins were overturned, Car alarms were set off and trees fell. However, we awoke on Friday morning to clearer skies and the prospect of a calmer day. The same could not be said for the political storm that was brewing following the results of the Stoke and Copeland by-election results.

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Inequality: Broken Promises

malick By Malick Nythern Doucoure

11th May 2010 and 13th July 2016.

These two dates may be years apart, and there have certainly been plenty of political developments between them, but they both share one thing in common: both saw newly elected Conservative leaders make promises of fighting inequality and creating a Great Britain that works for Britons. Both leaders subsequently failed to deliver on their promises, with policies that only worked to further exacerbate the deep socio-economic differences this nation is struggling to fight through. Oh, and if you haven’t figured it out already, I’m talking about David Cameron and Theresa May. Continue reading “Inequality: Broken Promises”