Category: Human Rights

What Has Motivated the Russian Youth to Protest Against Mevdev?

13124985_1187623707923241_3700041885703921844_n By Yury Polyakov

Russian Domestic Politics is probably the most boring subject for all enthusiastic researchers in Russian Studies. Russian people view Vladimir Putin as the new Brezhnev because his style is similar to Brezhnev’s tactics over the Zastoy days. In other words, you can sum up Putin message as ‘Sleep tight, my beloved country’. In 2000, Vladimir Zhirinovsky argued that Putin’s era would be calm and stable. In effect, the LDPR’s leader was right when he said that, as the TV was no longer a debate platform. Likewise, Ex-Duma Speaker Boris Gryzlov made another decisive statement when he described Duma as the place which does not exist for political discussions. Personally, I believe that these were obviously gloomy. There have been moments when awful things as the Second Chechen War, Kursk, terrorist acts, Beslan, and several other sad events have occurred in the 2000s. Continue reading “What Has Motivated the Russian Youth to Protest Against Mevdev?”

NGOs and Their Role in Human Security

Gavin Picture By Gavin Davies

Humanitarian efforts have saved countless lives, but have been accused of making bad situations worse. The impact of this duality has grown after the end of the Cold War, when the USSR and the US removed support from their respective spheres of influence and left a power vacuum. With no interest or support coming from other states, individuals organized means for assistance much like that which they had done for local charities. The internationalization of charity work spread, and now there are nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and civil society organizations (CSOs) for every need and occasion for relief and development all over the globe (Michael, 2002, p. 4). But as NGOs proliferate, what effects does this have on the world? Continue reading “NGOs and Their Role in Human Security”

In the blind-eye of the media; the role of women in the Syrian Civil War

20170306_183051 By Lola Scurlock

According to the UN, International Women’s Day is a global event to acknowledge progress made in women’s rights, to advocate for change and to proclaim the role of common women in altering the history of their nations and communities through acts of courage and determination. On the 8th of March, we will celebrate International Women’s Day and one of the top ongoing topics that will be discussed is the role of Syrian women in the Syrian Civil War.

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The Openness Of Societies

13612203_10206155636603188_4130233331516496311_n By Gavin Davies

Humanity groans, half crushed beneath the weight of its own progress. It does not sufficiently realize that its future is in its own hands. It is up to humanity to see if first of all it wants to keep on living. It is then up to it to ask whether it wants to merely live, or whether in addition it wants to make the necessary effort required for fulfilling [life].

Bergson 1977, p. 317

There is a pervasive belief that human rights could be met if people just understood each other better. If only people could care about all people as much as their family and friends! Continue reading “The Openness Of Societies”

Fidel Castro’s Death, and What it Means to the Rest of the World

14355033_1381372131892109_8836122230010910437_n By Jennifer Amspacher

Fidel Castro was 90 years old when he died on November 25, 2016. He was frail and sickly, yet his death still came to the world as a shock. Fidel Castro was President of Cuba from December 2, 1976 to February 24, 2008, when he resigned and gave power to his brother, Raúl Castro. Not only did he hold Presidency in Cuba for 47 years, Castro was first a law student at University of Havana– then rebel, revolutionary, self-proclaimed anti-imperialist and pro-soviet socialist; labeled as a fearsome dictator by critics and as an everlasting legend and icon by his supporters. The late Fidel Castro, no matter how you view him, was indubitably one of the most politically influential figures in Latin American history.

Continue reading “Fidel Castro’s Death, and What it Means to the Rest of the World”

Exploitation of Refugees Left, Right, and Centre

mariam By Mariam Tuma

Since the “beginning” of the European Refugee Crisis, a term problematic in its own right, we have been bombarded with mass media campaigns trying to propagate a particular narrative on the issue. The construction of loaded terminology evoking particular emotions, ideologies, and reactions has characterised the very foundation of reporting on the issue.

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Crisis in Venezuela: What’s Really Going On?

14055118_1645172599129010_5639526167748039418_n By Emma Temple

Perhaps not dominating, but infiltrating headline news for over a year now, is the political turmoil in Venezuela. The somewhat secondary reporting style regarding this crisis could perhaps be assigned to the fact that more ‘pressing’ matters concern the west at the moment; but you only need to obtain a few of the facts regarding life on Venezuelan streets in order to truly understand the sheer catastrophic consequences that political corruption has had on Venezuelan society.

Continue reading “Crisis in Venezuela: What’s Really Going On?”