Category: Inequality

Comparing ‘populist’ revolutions: Ukraine and Egypt

Vlad By Vladimir Ivlev

“The ultimate difference between a truly radical emancipatory politics and populist politics is that the former is active, it imposes and enforces its vision, while populism is fundamentally re-active, the result of a reaction to a disturbing intruder.” – Slavoj Žižek, “First As Tragedy, Then As Farce” (2008)

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the overreaching Soviet social and political structure was replaced with swift liberalization of the markets and a bright promise of democracy. Yet, ironically, the Soviet structures of corruption and authoritarianism remained, giving the elite free reign over the new national civil and economic playgrounds. Two countries, Ukraine and Egypt, both having history in socialist policy, revolted against corruption at more or less concurrently. Continue reading “Comparing ‘populist’ revolutions: Ukraine and Egypt”

NGOs and Their Role in Human Security

Gavin Picture By Gavin Davies

Humanitarian efforts have saved countless lives, but have been accused of making bad situations worse. The impact of this duality has grown after the end of the Cold War, when the USSR and the US removed support from their respective spheres of influence and left a power vacuum. With no interest or support coming from other states, individuals organized means for assistance much like that which they had done for local charities. The internationalization of charity work spread, and now there are nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and civil society organizations (CSOs) for every need and occasion for relief and development all over the globe (Michael, 2002, p. 4). But as NGOs proliferate, what effects does this have on the world? Continue reading “NGOs and Their Role in Human Security”

A (sarcastic) critique of “Identity Politics and the Political Spectrum”

20170403_124702 By Peter Marshall

ONLY A SITH DEALS IN ABSOLUTES

-Obi Wan Kenobi, Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith

There comes a point when using the wholly academic Wikipedia to make a point becomes as bad as the Reductio ad Hitlerum fallacy (saying “Yeah, but Hitler thought/did that”). Mr. Ivlev wrote a Despatch Box article on the 9th of March criticising identity politics (or the politics of the “Social Justice Warrior”) and how it is neither left or right, but a liberal agenda. The intention of this article is to go through the article and criticise the wholly inaccurate portrayal of the many concepts Mr. Ivlev explores.

Continue reading “A (sarcastic) critique of “Identity Politics and the Political Spectrum””

Identity Politics and the Political Spectrum

Vlad By Vladimir Ivlev

“”Regressive left” (also formulated as “regressive liberals”) is a political epithet, used as a pejorative to describe a section of left-wing politics who are accused of paradoxically holding reactionary views by their tolerance of illiberal principles and ideologies, particularly tolerance of Islamism, for the sake of multiculturalism and cultural relativism.”

-Wikipedia

There comes a point when a fallacy becomes so popular that even Wikipedia has an article about it. This article serves as an attack on the severe misconception of branding the social-justice warrior complex as being left instead of right. In fact it’s neither.

Continue reading “Identity Politics and the Political Spectrum”

In the blind-eye of the media; the role of women in the Syrian Civil War

20170306_183051 By Lola Scurlock

According to the UN, International Women’s Day is a global event to acknowledge progress made in women’s rights, to advocate for change and to proclaim the role of common women in altering the history of their nations and communities through acts of courage and determination. On the 8th of March, we will celebrate International Women’s Day and one of the top ongoing topics that will be discussed is the role of Syrian women in the Syrian Civil War.

Continue reading “In the blind-eye of the media; the role of women in the Syrian Civil War”

The Openness Of Societies

13612203_10206155636603188_4130233331516496311_n By Gavin Davies

Humanity groans, half crushed beneath the weight of its own progress. It does not sufficiently realize that its future is in its own hands. It is up to humanity to see if first of all it wants to keep on living. It is then up to it to ask whether it wants to merely live, or whether in addition it wants to make the necessary effort required for fulfilling [life].

Bergson 1977, p. 317

There is a pervasive belief that human rights could be met if people just understood each other better. If only people could care about all people as much as their family and friends! Continue reading “The Openness Of Societies”

Inequality: Broken Promises

malick By Malick Nythern Doucoure

11th May 2010 and 13th July 2016.

These two dates may be years apart, and there have certainly been plenty of political developments between them, but they both share one thing in common: both saw newly elected Conservative leaders make promises of fighting inequality and creating a Great Britain that works for Britons. Both leaders subsequently failed to deliver on their promises, with policies that only worked to further exacerbate the deep socio-economic differences this nation is struggling to fight through. Oh, and if you haven’t figured it out already, I’m talking about David Cameron and Theresa May. Continue reading “Inequality: Broken Promises”