On Tuesday evening, the Government suffered a historic defeat in the House of Commons. The Withdrawal Agreement that Theresa May has spent years negotiating and months trying to sell to MPs was decisively rejected-202 ayes to 432 noes. In the aftermath of this catastrophic defeat and the subsequent failed Vote of No Confidence, what now for Brexit? Some of our writers share their thoughts on the situation.

 

By Thomas Sherlock

Today has been dramatic to say the least.

Two secretaries of state have resigned. Two junior ministers have resigned. Several MPs have publicly declared their letters to the 1922 Committee, calling for a vote of no confidence in the leadership of Theresa May. The necessary 48 letters have not been received (yet).

Studying politics often means deriving a strange sense of enjoyment out of tumultuous days such as this, and it’s easy to see why. Twists and turns at all corners, sudden character developments-it’s the same reason TV series such as House of Cards and Bodyguard entertain. However unlike those shows, today might have very, very real consequences.

By Thomas Sherlock

imagesIn this comprehensive book, Tim Shipman aims to document the tumultuous events of British politics from the rise of Theresa May in July 2016 to her leadership under siege in October 2017. A follow-up to his previous book All-Out War, which covered the lead-up, campaign and immediate aftermath of the EU referendum in 2016, Fall Out provides an insight into the events that followed, ranging from the Chiefs’ management of Number 10, plotting in the corridors of Parliament and how the election thought to be the ultimate coup for May turned into a defeat snatched from the jaws of victory. Summarised as above, it is easy to mistake the events of the last two years for that of a political thriller.

Partisanship

By Thomas Sherlock

Last week the Government of the United States of America shutdown. This is a very odd concept from a British perspective but it’s one made possible by the complex system of checks and balances imposed by the constitution. Most of last week was spent with politicians pointing the finger at the other faction, however the real cause of the shutdown may lie in much broader problem: political partisanship.