Comparing ‘populist’ revolutions: Ukraine and Egypt

Vlad By Vladimir Ivlev

“The ultimate difference between a truly radical emancipatory politics and populist politics is that the former is active, it imposes and enforces its vision, while populism is fundamentally re-active, the result of a reaction to a disturbing intruder.” – Slavoj Žižek, “First As Tragedy, Then As Farce” (2008)

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the overreaching Soviet social and political structure was replaced with swift liberalization of the markets and a bright promise of democracy. Yet, ironically, the Soviet structures of corruption and authoritarianism remained, giving the elite free reign over the new national civil and economic playgrounds. Two countries, Ukraine and Egypt, both having history in socialist policy, revolted against corruption at more or less concurrently. Continue reading “Comparing ‘populist’ revolutions: Ukraine and Egypt”

The Death of Bipartisanship

12741871_1267539223273075_6063705862090352672_n By Malick Nythern Doucoure

The Trump administration hits its 90 day landmark this Thursday and a quick glance at its scandals and achievements reveal deep divisions that will scar American politics for the next four years and unfortunately, the same could be said for the next few decades. The US Legislative branch’s de facto policy of Bipartisanship has been a major driving force behind the success of countless committee hearings, bills and senate approvals, thus one cannot emphasise enough the importance of bipartisanship for the maintenance and continuity of the US political scene. 90 days ago, political commentators were writing on the importance of Bipartisanship. Now, political commentators are writing obituaries for it. Continue reading “The Death of Bipartisanship”

What Has Motivated the Russian Youth to Protest Against Mevdev?

13124985_1187623707923241_3700041885703921844_n By Yury Polyakov

Russian Domestic Politics is probably the most boring subject for all enthusiastic researchers in Russian Studies. Russian people view Vladimir Putin as the new Brezhnev because his style is similar to Brezhnev’s tactics over the Zastoy days. In other words, you can sum up Putin message as ‘Sleep tight, my beloved country’. In 2000, Vladimir Zhirinovsky argued that Putin’s era would be calm and stable. In effect, the LDPR’s leader was right when he said that, as the TV was no longer a debate platform. Likewise, Ex-Duma Speaker Boris Gryzlov made another decisive statement when he described Duma as the place which does not exist for political discussions. Personally, I believe that these were obviously gloomy. There have been moments when awful things as the Second Chechen War, Kursk, terrorist acts, Beslan, and several other sad events have occurred in the 2000s. Continue reading “What Has Motivated the Russian Youth to Protest Against Mevdev?”

The Politics of Fear is everywhere – how can we stop it?

14055118_1645172599129010_5639526167748039418_n-2 By Emma Temple

If there is one thing that binds together humans, politically or otherwise, it is a resounding fear of the unknown. Fear is the ultimate mechanism for control and as such is a primary feature of the discourse both within international relations and domestic politics. To combat this requires a significant overhaul of not only the way in which political debates are conducted, but also the way we as individuals choose to prioritise our political concerns. Continue reading “The Politics of Fear is everywhere – how can we stop it?”